Glaucoma

Glaucoma


What is Glaucoma?

Glaucoma is a form of damage to the optic nerve in the back of the eye. The optic nerve connects your eye to your brain and transmits the information we need to be able to see. The damage can be caused by excessive pressure inside your eye (intraocular pressure or IOP) and other factors.

What is the consequence of glaucoma?

With optic nerve damage, you may begin to lose your peripheral vision. Your peripheral vision is that vision which is outside of your central gaze. Over time, if glaucoma damage is severe, you may begin to lose your central vision as well.

What are the different types of glaucoma?

The primary forms of glaucoma are called open-angle and closed-angle glaucoma.

What is the angle of the eye?

The angle refers to space in the very front part of your eye, between the cornea and the iris. It is where the fluid the eye produces exits the eye.  

What is open-angle glaucoma?

Open Angle Glaucoma Fort WorthYour eye produces an internal fluid called aqueous humor. Aqueous humor drainage takes place in a structure called the trabecular meshwork, located in the angle of the eye. In open-angle glaucoma, there is a malfunction to the the trabecular meshwork (black box in the picture). We do not know precisely what causes this malfunction. We do know that there are known risk-factors, such as age, a family history of glaucoma, history of taking steroid medication or prior trauma. As a consequence of the malfunction, aqueous fluid doesn’t drain quickly enough, causing the IOP to become elevated, leading to optic nerve damage.

What is closed-angle glaucoma?

Closed Angle Glaucoma Fort WorthAs seen in the picture above, the aqueous fluid has a difficult time passing between the iris and the lens.  The pushes the iris forward leading to a narrowing of the angle. This, in turn, can lead to optic nerve damage. IOP can be elevated in this form of glaucoma, but not always.

 

How can my glaucoma specialist know if I have open vs closed-angle glaucoma?

Your glaucoma specialist uses a specialized contact lens called a gonioprism to evaluate the angle. This is painless assessment done during the course of your eye exam..

I have high blood pressure. Is this causing my high IOP?

No. There is no clear association between elevated blood pressure and IOP. Blood pressure relates to the pressure of blood in your blood vessels. IOP elevation usually relates to a malfunction in the drainage system of the eye, preventing normal aqueous fluid drainage.

My physician told me that I have glaucoma. Am I going to go blind?

Fortunately, with proper treatment and follow up, blindness from glaucoma can normally be prevented.

Is there a cure for glaucoma?

At present, there is no cure for glaucoma, but proper treatment usually prevents vision loss.  Read more about glaucoma treatment options.

 

 

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Fort Worth, TX 76102


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Hurst Town Center
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Granbury, TX 76049


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804 Santa Fe Drive
Weatherford, TX 76086


Telephone:
817-594-9500

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